An Intuitive Derivation/Proof of the Sum of an Infinite Geometric Series based on Zeno’s Paradox

A geometric series is a series of numbers where each number in the series is equal to the previous number multiplied by a constant multiplication factor. For example: 2, 4, 6, 8, 16… is a geometric series with a constant multiplication factor of 2.

The sum to infinity of such a sequence, then, can be represented as:

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WordPress.com Stats Scraper

Something that has been annoying me for a while is that there is no way to download your WordPress.com stats from the website!

So I wrote a script in python to allow you to download all of your stats into a spreadsheet. Here is the guide.

Basically, you need to provide the script with an example XML Http Request (XHR) where the website is pulling stats data from the WordPress.com server. From this XHR, the script then reconstructs a new XHR to get all of the data.

Soft Switching – Reverse engineering the LCR45

Soft switching allows a single button to be used as both an input and a power button. An example of this is the LCR45 LCR meter from Peak Electonic Design which has two buttons – on/menu and enter/off. As you can tell from the names, both buttons operate to turn the device on/off and also trigger the menu and enter functions in the interface.

This could be achieved by using both buttons only as inputs to the processor (a PIC in this case) and never turning the chip off, simply putting it into low power mode and using the ‘on’ button to wake it from this sleep. But even the best low power mode uses more power than actually turning the device off and the battery would eventually drain. So how can we achieve a multipurpose button and still use no power when turned off? To answer this I reverse engineered the LCR45 and drew out the circuit which I will now explain.

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Hackathon: PAL – Proximity Alert Locator

Yesterday, I had just got back from campus and was just enjoying a coffee before I got down to work when I got a message from a friend:

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“…come and build stuff…”

There was an event on campus called “Make Cool ShMIT – again!”, where they provide a bunch of components and (more importantly) pizza, and you build something in teams for 2 hours. I decided that work could wait and hopped on the bus to campus.

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